891 14th St. Denver, CO 80202 Tu - Sat 11am-close / Sun 9:30 - 8 / Monday (vary on Convention/Show schedule) (720) 330-8487
 
 
 

MEDIA & REVIEW

  • Okay! This is my second review in my life. I'm a Industry person. I've worked all over and I know great service and good food( not to sound pretentious). Uncle Joes was amazing! Chef Thach sent us out some snacks! Sweet potato tots. I'm gonna be honest; I hate sweet potatoes! But these were F-ing amazing/addicting. This time Chef Joshua sent us Pork dumplings in black vinegar and chili oil... These were so juicy and flavorful. Okay... Here we go about the Hot Pot! The hot pot was so cool! I have never done that ever in my life! This was the funniest thing I've ever done at a restaurant. Thank you for that experience! My entree was the fried chicken. Oh man this was better than "mission Chinese foods" in New York. This chicken was spot on! Amazing flavor! Totally reminded me a classic Sichuan friend Chicken from when I was a kid. It brought back memories. The dessert was spot on as well! We will be back for more! I'm addicted to this place now! My new hang over spot... Or in general.... Favorite spot downtown! Thank you chef Thach & Chef Joshua.
    JON MENDOZA
    JON MENDOZA
  • The Ten Best Asian Noodle Houses in Denver Uncle Joe's noodle slate may be small, but what's there is worth a foray into the bustling heart of downtown. Recipes come from China's island city and feature layered flavors of hard-to-come-by sauces and wok hai — that special something added by a searing-hot and well-seasoned pan. Grab a seat at the bar for some clever cocktails and a plate of something far from standard, overly sweetened takeout fare. What to order: Uncle Joe's was founded in Hong Kong (ours is only the second in the world), and the Law family (which owns both) brings back dried scallops to make its own XO sauce in-house — which is then added to a shrimp-and-scallop dish with tight coils of noodles called "rice pillows." Try it and thank us later.
    MARK ANTONATION
    MARK ANTONATION
  • The real plates of Hong Kong Unless you’ve actually been to Hong Kong, you probably have no idea what the cuisine there is really like. Recently, however, Uncle Joe’s Hong Kong Bistro {720.330.8487} opened in a prime spot downtown right by the Convention Center at 14th and Champa in early 2015. In a beautiful setting with modern, artsy décor, Uncle Joe’s serves the true cuisine of Hong Kong. Chefs de Cuisine Ryan Baldwin and Guy Simsiman are dedicated to introducing Denverites to Hong Kong’s authentic flavors. Whether you come for lunch, dinner, or Sunday brunch, be sure to try Uncle Joe’s signature Cha Shao—extraordinary barbecue pork—on sliders, atop a salad, with fried rice, or starring in an entrée. Or get acquainted with Uncle Joe’s menu during happy hour (daily 3-6pm), when you can explore a medley of small plates and well drinks, beer, or house wine for just a few bucks. Save
    DINING OUT DENVER & BOULDER
    DINING OUT DENVER & BOULDER
  • by Andra Zeppelin @AndraZeppelin May 12, 2016, 10:10am A modern Chinese restaurant, this Downtown spot offers a fun dim sum brunch complemented by $15 bottomless brunch cocktails.    
    ANDRA ZEPPELIN
    ANDRA ZEPPELIN
  • Two years have passed since I began my exploration of Denver’s international food scene with the Ethniche series. Originally a monthly study of a single cuisine, it morphed into a look at individual dishes and their provenance, as well as a study of interpretations of specific preparations across various cultural groups. The series started with a quest for Hawaiian Spam musubi, and over the years I’ve even thrown in a few recipes based on finds at the city’s many international markets. Rice Pillows in XO Sauce, Uncle Joe’s Hong Kong Bistro Shrimp and scallops are ostensibly the stars in this bowl of traditional Hong Kong flavors. But the XO sauce — made from dried scallops, chiles, cured pork and other exotic ingredients toted back from visits to China — is what gives the seafood its lush, dark coating and mystifying flavor. Little bouncy coils of broad rice noodle add a whimsical element that makes the dish a delight. Even in the heart of downtown’s tourist zone, Uncle Joe’s turns out Chinese cuisine that would fit right in to any major city’s Chinatown.
    BY MARK ANTONATION
    BY MARK ANTONATION
JON MENDOZA
Okay! This is my second review in my life. I'm a Industry person. I've worked all over and I know great service and good food( not to sound pretentious). Uncle Joes was amazing! Chef Thach sent us out some snacks! Sweet potato tots. I'm gonna be honest; I hate sweet potatoes! But these were F-ing amazing/addicting. This time Chef Joshua sent us Pork dumplings in black vinegar and chili oil... These were so juicy and flavorful. Okay... Here we go about the Hot Pot! The hot pot was so cool! I have never done that ever in my life! This was the funniest thing I've ever done at a restaurant. Thank you for that experience! My entree was the fried chicken. Oh man this was better than "mission Chinese foods" in New York. This chicken was spot on! Amazing flavor! Totally reminded me a classic Sichuan friend Chicken from when I was a kid. It brought back memories. The dessert was spot on as well! We will be back for more! I'm addicted to this place now! My new hang over spot... Or in general.... Favorite spot downtown! Thank you chef Thach & Chef Joshua.
JON MENDOZA
CHEF
MARK ANTONATION
The Ten Best Asian Noodle Houses in Denver Uncle Joe's noodle slate may be small, but what's there is worth a foray into the bustling heart of downtown. Recipes come from China's island city and feature layered flavors of hard-to-come-by sauces and wok hai — that special something added by a searing-hot and well-seasoned pan. Grab a seat at the bar for some clever cocktails and a plate of something far from standard, overly sweetened takeout fare. What to order: Uncle Joe's was founded in Hong Kong (ours is only the second in the world), and the Law family (which owns both) brings back dried scallops to make its own XO sauce in-house — which is then added to a shrimp-and-scallop dish with tight coils of noodles called "rice pillows." Try it and thank us later.
MARK ANTONATION
-
DINING OUT DENVER & BOULDER
The real plates of Hong Kong Unless you’ve actually been to Hong Kong, you probably have no idea what the cuisine there is really like. Recently, however, Uncle Joe’s Hong Kong Bistro {720.330.8487} opened in a prime spot downtown right by the Convention Center at 14th and Champa in early 2015. In a beautiful setting with modern, artsy décor, Uncle Joe’s serves the true cuisine of Hong Kong. Chefs de Cuisine Ryan Baldwin and Guy Simsiman are dedicated to introducing Denverites to Hong Kong’s authentic flavors. Whether you come for lunch, dinner, or Sunday brunch, be sure to try Uncle Joe’s signature Cha Shao—extraordinary barbecue pork—on sliders, atop a salad, with fried rice, or starring in an entrée. Or get acquainted with Uncle Joe’s menu during happy hour (daily 3-6pm), when you can explore a medley of small plates and well drinks, beer, or house wine for just a few bucks. Save
DINING OUT DENVER & BOULDER
-
ANDRA ZEPPELIN
by Andra Zeppelin @AndraZeppelin May 12, 2016, 10:10am A modern Chinese restaurant, this Downtown spot offers a fun dim sum brunch complemented by $15 bottomless brunch cocktails.    
ANDRA ZEPPELIN
@AndraZeppelin
-
BY MARK ANTONATION
Two years have passed since I began my exploration of Denver’s international food scene with the Ethniche series. Originally a monthly study of a single cuisine, it morphed into a look at individual dishes and their provenance, as well as a study of interpretations of specific preparations across various cultural groups. The series started with a quest for Hawaiian Spam musubi, and over the years I’ve even thrown in a few recipes based on finds at the city’s many international markets. Rice Pillows in XO Sauce, Uncle Joe’s Hong Kong Bistro Shrimp and scallops are ostensibly the stars in this bowl of traditional Hong Kong flavors. But the XO sauce — made from dried scallops, chiles, cured pork and other exotic ingredients toted back from visits to China — is what gives the seafood its lush, dark coating and mystifying flavor. Little bouncy coils of broad rice noodle add a whimsical element that makes the dish a delight. Even in the heart of downtown’s tourist zone, Uncle Joe’s turns out Chinese cuisine that would fit right in to any major city’s Chinatown.
BY MARK ANTONATION
-